About

Too often we use objects without thinking about the environmental impact they have on our planet and how harmful they are for the environment. Few or almost none of us know what's behind these objects, because we don't think about it or because it has become normal in our daily lives to use them. This site retraces the life process of these objects, from their production to their disposal; we aim at explaining the characteristics of their components, how to dispose them in the correct way and possible sustainable alternatives.

Close

Production


Receipts are made of thermal paper, a material covered with a dye and a reagent. They are additionally coated with bisphenol A or BPA, a potentially toxic plastic substance. These components ensure the durability of the ink on the paper, which is a prerequisite for receipts to be a long-term warranty of a purchase.
Close

Disposal


As opposed to what most people may think, receipts must not be tossed with the paper waste, but in the unsorted waste instead. The incorrect disposal of receipts can cause damage to the recycling process because of the reaction that thermal paper has under heat sources, resulting in the release of toxic emissions.
Close

Alternatives


An alternative to thermal paper for printing receipts is to use paper based on cellulose rather than BPA, which can then be recycled with the rest of the paper.
Usefoul links:
(EcoThermal, Ecochit)
Close

Production


Classic pyramid tea bags, when in contact with boiling water, release billions of plastic micro and nano-particles which, besides being harmful for ourselves, are harmful for the environment too: these particles travel with waste water into the sewers and consequently into the seas and oceans.
Close

Disposal


Unlike hemp or paper bags, most pyramid bags should be thrown in the unsorted waste rather than the green waste, in order to reduce traces of micro-plastics in the compost.
Close

Alternatives


The alternatives to classic tea-bags are various, from paper or hemp bags to tea leaf infusion, which is certainly the most sustainable choice. In fact, infusions are made by putting the tea leaves into a metal (or silicon) filter, which can then be reused several times and that can last for years.
Close

Production


Tetrapack is a of kind packaging made of several materials (75% paper, 20% polyethylene and 5% aluminium). Since it is not a monomaterial, the recycling process of tetrapack is certainly more complex than those of simple materials, as well as more expensive in terms of energy needed for its treatment.
Close

Disposal


Even though tetrapack is made up of several materials, the correct way to dispose it is to toss it in the paper bin. During the recycling process paper, polyethylene and aluminium are first divided and then recycled; the necessary stage in which tetrapack’s components are separated determines the high costs of tetrapack’s recycling process.
Close

Alternatives


The most sustainable alternative to Tetrapack is that of using different packaging such as paper or glass, which are certainly easier to recycle and that can be used several times.
Close

Production


Cigarette filters are made from cellulose acetate, a plastic material the decomposition of which requires several years. In addition, cigarette butts also contain toxic substances present in tobacco, these making them even more polluting than standard plastic.
Close

Disposal


Every year billions of filters are abandoned in the environment, making cigarette butts the main cause of pollution in the world. Avoiding their dispersion would already be a step forward, and the most correct way to dispose them is to throw them into the unsorted waste.
Close

Alternatives


There are ways of reducing the environmental impact of cigarette butts, such as rolling cigarettes using biodegradable filters or using electronic cigarettes. However, these kinds of alternatives would not completely eliminate the ecological consequences that cigarettes have on the environment.
Close

Production


Chewing gums are composed of a mixture of synthetic polymers, non-biodegradable, flavoured and sweetened, processed and mixed together. Chewing gum degrades in the environment in 5 years.
Close

Disposal


Gums should be thrown in the unsorted waste, but most of the time they are dispersed in the environment. Removing them is very expensive and very polluting. To do so, it is necessary to use chemicals and disinfectants, as well as a powerful jet of water, which pulverizes them, and sends them into sewers, seas and oceans.
Close

Alternatives


Usually, chewing gum is used to relieve stress or to stop smoking, and a natural alternative to it may be licorice sticks.